Binyavanga Uncut…

In which i try and capture a long, rambling, regret-soaked set of tweets by Binyavanga Wainana reflecting late Friday, May 15, on the dissembling life of gay men like himself and how sex is the least of one’s problems…

The tweets welled up almost spontaneously, unstoppable, even extending to a promise to visit Kingston, Jamaica in December this year but mostly they express anguish over past wrongs induced by the pressure to conform to society’s demand for appropriately masculine behaviour from boy children. They also mention fellow African writers Chimamanda Adichie and Elnathan John…and Bishop Tutu and Ruto, Kenya’s Deputy President, whose speech may have precipitated Wainana’s stream of tweets.
The most meaningful thing I read yesterday were @BinyavangaW‘s tweets. That man moves me.
God save us from African writers who prosecute your rights to be urself on earth based on what their pastor says 2 them.
Coz she makes you feel, like nobody else. Nina Simone.  via @YouTube
“I am in your hands” a text I sent when defeated by my defenses. Because I loved him. Loved him. Releasing 2 love is very very hard.
It took doctors to tell me I was near death to let myself text him and say I love you, and i release myself to you. Gay love! God?!
How do you love when the ground shifts over your feet every minute?
How do you love when you can’t hold hands in a hospital room?
how do you love with your parents, cousins friends, unable to digest?
How do you love as a gay man except by defiance always? defiance or self destruction?
Africans important 2 discuss these things, human people really are all first just about loving before food, human rights, procreation.
people think sexuality is about having sex. So, then why don’t you all give up sexual love,a and passion?
so much of our world here is about quick borrowed intimacy..sharing a bed with a man and being free when when u do not fuck.
people call u in tears and leave wives to come to you not for sex but because who else will understand? and u hold them all night.
When Ruto opens his mouth or of of those fucking hate bishops, gays change routes coming home on public transportation.
gays try hard to not show themselves, but all of them live in fear always, u relax for a few months and some shit happens in the news…
when Ruto speaks and theca church people in the news, gays get evicted from apartments, get threatening text messages. EVERy time.
We find ourselves always protecting our straight people, loving them coz they r weak and brittle often. We can’t shut off love, u see.
baldwin, was also just yet another black gay first born man saving his family first, putting his life 4 black people first, love: last.
So in the morning after he has cried and cried, you make coffee for him and give him support to put his straight face on and face Africa.
many gay African couples in the europe adopt and have children who r straight, & loved and still hide their families from people back home.
@BinyavangaW: How do you love when you can’t hold hands in a hospital room?” Or at the funerals, clan gathering. Your very tears hidden?
u hear stories how in primary school your own brother walked away in shame when you were beaten for being girly and u were five years old.
and that evening, ashamed and unable, you cracked jokes to make your brother feel okay, because u ra ashamed u shamed him.
Kenyan church can never invite Bishop Tutu 2 speak. He loves gays, straights, revolutionaries, feminists.
Why can’t our churches march with women against violence in #idressasIwant – u can disagree and still show public support 4 women.
@BinyavangaW: gay African couples adopt & have children, straight, & loved & still hide from people back home.” Can’t introduce ours 2 clan
kenyan church r terrified of love and change and truth. They are there to police you to expect little, and pretend to expect much.
I have an essay to write about 3 homosexual men I helped humiliate in high school, I am deeply ashamed. Always.
Kenya will break! Break apart! If we open our hearts to being ourselves and to accepting that there is what we do not know.
Bishop Tutu the same product of the same Colonial missions. He just liberated himself t b 4 Africa, not to be a colonial sin collector.
Give credit 2 the man Tutu who can walk into the most dangerous township and preach love and tell them they have to love gay people 2.
When I went to SA, Tutu was a revelation. Just love love and freedom. I did not imagine such a thing could exist.
Finally “independence” made us overseers of the African colonial plantations, now do what about freeing ourselves from this role?
So try to imagine the heaven that Tutu will go to, and Ruto’s heaven (14 cowering virgins?)
Fine. On the Winnie Versus Tutu thing, me I am with Winnie. But apart from SA, our African cowardly safe rich churches care for nothing.
@BinyavangaW Good phrase: Tutu not “a colonial sin collector”. Wish more religious leaders would focus on the real evil of poverty instead
Which African church elder will say I do not understand u Jide Macauley, but I come to see u 2 pray together. Because I fight 2 love.
I see our priests, even the ‘Africaniser’ ones wearing the ideas and self-hates of the Colonial District Officers and so on. Same game.
Black South Africa really did shake up the post colonial narrative” flawed,raw and dangerous, u took us forward into new possibilities.
Must pay credit here 2 the liberationists in catholic church who hosted, mentored Nyerere, Mugabe…. stand 4 their ideas.
I feel it is my job, and the job of our generation to poke past all this shit, even when it was good, and see into how 2 make new integrity.
It is no longer about the growth of the nation. The firming of its order or disorder.
When will Kenyan PCEA invite Ngugi wa Thiongo to speak? Can they self-interrogate?
Our parents, careful with us in a hostile world freed us into knowledge so we can fight them 2 make this world. Pay no homage 2 their dogma
U did not come to earn to approval of ur father & mother African! U are there to make a world 4 ur children’s children. DO what u must do
Joburg: housands of gay African professionals wanting 2 work make black Africa better. Today, in Africa, they contribute. Today.Amazing.
I turned down a great job in Joburg, wanting t be fully in the continent. But I really want to be in the fight here, in this ‘other Africa.’
@BinyavangaW Having the most institutionalised political party/movement in Africa helps hugely. No big man politics In SA.
@bettywaitherero to look for ways to break apart your own mobility to be what is necessary 2 carry us all. to refuse fear..Yes.
@bettywaitherero terrifying, as all purposed things must be.
@BinyavangaW introspective and review is necessary if you are growing and not static. gotta change your mind often. :)
me: fucking ego man V competitive, and I have had over the years had 2 fight myself 2 accommodate the Chimamanda jaggernaught.
Now. It is okay to have that fight inside you over that woman who is seemingly ruling the world. And u wanted 2 2.
Chimamanda and I agree on exactly nothing from the first day. And then she was like, then, this young young woman.
In our own relationship as writers, what has come to matter is..Chimamanda and I
Is that Chimamanda will have the confidence, each time, 2 go further than I will, for me, to ask me to take myself further.
In truth: I am theonw who is noisy conservative scared 2 try, and Chimamanda is the one writer who asks me to take my project further.
cozy work seems so experimental, people don’t understand this thing. Real relevant honesty defines our friendship and working relationship.
Chimamands is the first human person who looked me in the eye and asked me, are you gay? That is what love looks like. Now I go to sleep.
@BinyavangaW Have you read Men of the South – Zukiswa Wanner. Something related to that tweet.
@Omuteso am laughing.long story..but i shall I owe tax there.
when somebody does that 2 u, u have to step up and b the same kinda honest always with them and 4 them. That is a New Africa #chimamanda.
don’t u feel that, that people see u, and choose not to see u?
@BinyavangaW If you ever need a Naija beard sha… Get at me. I’d do it for free if you let me rub your clean shaven head.
@AfroVII I do, bring me shea butter ,and some sexy beard juju.
So, Chimamanda is my big sister, & I am cool. and I am like older and got 2 Caine Prize before. Could give not a shit. Was neva like that.
@mairekayegi lol. send 500,000 dollars by western union pse. lol.
people look around you, around you, and so few people get friend u look At u. Too painful and vulnerable
@BinyavangaW how many times have you said you’re going to sleep Binya, yet there are new tweets every minute on my TL (not complaining)
@SafiaA lol. this vulnerability shit is hard, so i started whiskey.
@BinyavangaW Got these off Sister Joy’s fb page.
@SafiaA I made the mistake of listening to Nina Simone. FUCK!
Hooi. So now like after a year or 2 after Chimamanda opens a bomb in myself which was ready. I hire this six foot seven Naija gay escort.
I am in London, have been for years online wondering where to find a man to do..something..that I do not know what.
And gay bars are full if 19 year olds with 3 percent fat..
the other person whom I love deeply, Martin Kimani. I am staying in their home,
O I go online and book an escort called Black Orpheus. i have been watching him online 4 months. He is Nigerian. In London.
And I pay him 200 pounds to give me a nude massage. I feel nothing sexually, and he is super hot. I just feel,….shit…I did not die.
So. That night back at my old buddy Martin’s, we r drinking beer, and i start, not gay…but today, this is what i did.
And I tell martin everything that happened: very coldly , and watch his face twist and turn and fall and climb.
fucker opens me a new beer, and says, wow. So, are u okay? And I say. Yes. and 4 the 2nd time I know 2 people love me without condition
That was 2004/2005, and the journey these loves set me on started my real life. And I am still young, 44, as a gay man.
U cry, and ask, why did I not tell martin all this when I was 19? how many years of nonsense would that have saved?
@BinyavangaW i need a book from you about your queer experience, i need it,i need it. Its not my place to need it but i do
@fistvoices lol. not soon. nt like that..some r coming.
i thank everything wonderful in the world that I am an African second born man. God, what do my first born African gay brothers go through?
trust me when I say that my memoir was as gay as I could be with my father (oh I love that wonderful man) alive. It is gay.
@afrolicious and u and all of us, not me, this is about all os us facing ourselves with love…
Not making these tweets Africans coz I am having a bad time. That is a lie. I am am always mostly happy. Am sharing myself as we should.
I knew I was gay, but though that shit is all flexibility, be a rubber band of achievement, and then it will b fine, fine.
if gay in high school, middle class high school, and u r not girly, option 2 just all pretend 2 this day. Play ‘white’/ play assexual.
I played a woman in our celebrated school play wore a miniskirt a sex worker called Desiree. Wore a miniskirt, high heels.
Was contemptuous of my straight friends in boarding school. I was witty, sat near the powerful and when make-up was off…it was our game.
could wear a role 4 for ‘boys’ – and I could take it off, and they would think ah..he is artistic but supports ruby. I was always a prefect.
But in Lenana, as a prefect, stories come to you about love affairs. I remember the beautiful broken gay boy – name ruined across school.
I never looked him in the eye. Now, that I knew him to be like me, and me safely fooling the straight machos, I needed him o disappear.
Like so many gay Africans online, I hated on the femmes, the men who cannot mask their sexuality. As we do with tribe, we beat them down.
@MagungaWilliams mangu in my time was nowhere as violent and Lenana on sexuality. Leanne was a very very violent school.
@fistvoices i dont. but this is an issue. just like tribe on the sleeve and its costs.
@fistvoices A good 30 percent of online profiles of gay men or more on websites people say be straight acting, No femmes,
@fistvoices on Sites, gay Africas threaten open violence on effeminate gays who cannot hide, and insult them with no shame.
@fistvoices same siasa, as kenyans on Somalis, or not inviting your unfavored tribe friends t dinner when ur tribe in power.
@BinyavangaW true,its how we police gender performance, the idea of not having to wear your homosexuality,its prevalent and divisive
@fistvoices policed by your own fellow gays.
@BinyavangaW forgetting that the majority of the people that have been queer active were not hegemonic gender performers
@BinyavangaW they wore their homosexuality
@BinyavangaW i am seemingly buff,but buff is not masculine, right now i am wearing leggings, and i notice the stares
So, cheers 2 all the straight brother, siblings, sisters, friends, random Africans who see & saw u and keep u alive, because that is life.
@BinyavangaW how dare he waste his body? How dare he wears that persona while he looks like that?
carole mwai came 2 Chimamanda talk in NYC, was v young and she will not remember how she saved me from the boys and my brother. Teared up.
Chose, that day, 2 bake cakes with the girls with in the kitchen and bitch about the boys, and did not act as lieutenant. I was maybe 7.
They were like our closest family friends. I had been dying to escape the boys and hang in the kichen, bit I was my bros right hand man,
because all the boys were afraid of Caroline Mwai, when she said come, I came. I knew my bro and her bros would not do 2 much.
So. 4 the first time sat in the kitchen and baked and cooked and gossiped about the boys.
of course, my bro is getting all kinds of shit outside with the boys, and then he is like their leader.
My brother never ever made issue. because every photo we had he was there protecting me,
So. My the time we eat, My head is nearly hysterical with guilt. I have broken the boys code, I have shamed by brother.
What do I do. The neighbor ,visiting, is Darmindar Singh this Sikh Kenyan kid….
So while we ate what we baked, i announce that Darmindar is the 1 who told me that I should do that so he is a snitch.
I felt absolutely nothing, but sat and watched saw Darminder cry, thought him a sissy, and my bro said to me, we will sort him out.
I was not 9 years old. I thought, straight people so weak, they take any excuse 2 avoid truth that Indian Kenyan saved me from being gay.
So. i three Darminder under the bus 2 bb close to be boys who ruled Lena Moi primary, and be still cool with Caroline, who ruled also.
i have been a fucking manipulative gay kenyan getting my way. and still am. But lies kill us.
@chemelumadu fuck. i scared to ask. but it killed his vibe in school.. KILLED.
So disliking this new politics of them them progressives where queers activists and feminists black never did shit. Account 4 nothing.
@chemelumadu ngai. so totally ready to fly to him and say sorry. SORRY.
@ReneCMugenzi @BinyavangaW hahaha on Twitter Binyavanga’s head is all over the place, ill need follow ups and its not my book 2 write
Anybody willing to Storify and publish. do.
@BinyavangaW been trying to, Storify not cooperating but will keep trying…
now that u know ur sins, humans, address them and sleep Love 2 all!
Pray e that the El Nathan who showed so much genuine..something, will repudiate the African Museum mask he has chosen and be real.
Coz. don’t doubt me, his fans could give less of a shit, but El nathan’s ghosts brother him shitloads. lol. Always. Good truth 2 him.
It is the ones that show real promise, that really have a battle to fight, that u can crap on. lets s mo ‘child soldiers’ from that talent.
celebrate first if El Nathan wins caine prize, will he then look inside and give us something mo than best school composition for Oninbo?
4 El Nathan John – coz there’s mo u know. Ain’t Got No, I Got Life – Nina Simone  via @YouTube
@anniepaul shit. I need 2 drink with u I feel u have so much shit t call me 2 account 4 am comin 2 Jamaica okay?
anytime @BinyavangaW wow, that would be something…to have you here…
Elathan was 1 of the few nigerians in many years who was fighting to find something. Really. Special. Dangerous, and full of directions.
could even be that El nathan winning caine prize will release the truth man he is hiding 2 please the mild prize people. GOOD 4 literature.
@anniepaul just fucking airmiles I need. no near so far. REALLY. on my own would come to have wine. like tomorrow.
@BinyavangaW some Diemmesfontaine Pinotage would be perfect for the occasion :)
@fistvoices he does not know. that is he battle. Actually I he knows,.
@fistvoices hi satires built on mine, but he is no mimic, he has shit to say and make. but the writing SOOOOOO tame.
@fistvoices writing tamer than the guy u drink with, he is afraid of himself.
@fistvoices I hate fools. I cannot hate on Elnathan I want him to to amazing. He must just conquer himself. Not Caine and this silly game.
@anniepaul u been in my love since Achal so so long ago, but remember every internevention on twitter. EACH 1
@BinyavangaW wow didn’t know if you remembered that Achal had introed us…i was just with him in Joburg.
so, that musical “hitch your wagon 2 star” that Elnathan chose to play, fine, so now wat u wanted it 2 b joke song? Boy, it is not. Show.
Elnathan, all sarcastic terrified 2 speak and write what he really has to say 2 Nigeria. SHIT. So performs Caine Prize safe. real talent.
@anniepaul U ar like what Kingston is going to be in my head.
@anniepaul and we will sit and u will say i am really upset at u and u rr shit guy and we have 2 talk about it.
@anniepaul and I will say, do u have red wine…a nd bend over..
If you say so :) RT @BinyavangaW: @anniepaul and I will say, do u have red wine…a nd bend over..
bring all your African love 2 support El Nathan 4 caine Prize, ask him directly to grow. None of us need moral teenagers.
@anniepaul Love love love and I can’t spell anymore so am off;
Love>3 to you too…your wine and much else awaits in Kingston…come soon @BinyavangaW
@anniepaul @BinyavangaW Yes come — but only when I’m there!!
*rolls eyes and concedes* RT @keimiller: @anniepaul @BinyavangaW Yes come — but only when I’m there!!
i killed my banana bread drinking whiskey and tweeting, this is fucked up. Bye!
@keimiller @anniepaul u shut the fuck up Kei. U killed my banana bread
@keimiller @anniepaul it had whiskey, cardamon, lemon juice and baobab seed powder and is so fucking dry now.
mmmmm RT @BinyavangaW: @keimiller @anniepaul it had whiskey, cardamon, lemon juice and baobab seed powder and is so fucking dry now.
Nina Simone- Mood Indigo  via Kei Miller, Annie paul, Martin Kimani, Achal Prabhala…
@keimiller @anniepaul So am coming when u come to jOmaika! Love t U Kei.
@BinyavangaW @anniepaul June (maybe too soon) or December. Yeah man. Come we mek a flex. And Annie always has great wine…
@BinyavangaW @anniepaul and other great things beginning with ‘w’. Not like the shit we got in Nigeria. :(
@keimiller @anniepaul it’s like fuckedcookies now, It was supposed to be alike the derrida of affect, a 3 D paper. sigh.
@keimiller @anniepaul really interested especially in the geology and ancient eruptions u know,
@keimiller @anniepaul and evolving national museum practice
@keimiller @anniepaul and long thrusting fast bowlers and hip action
@keimiller @anniepaul BUT. last week it was high school politics I was sniffing at….learned a lot. A little LOT.
@keimiller @anniepaul haha. Who we g to which school and Why. and where did dat shit go…starting to sniff .
@keimiller @anniepaul Got Garnet drunk …conversation unfinished….lol
December it is, with or without Kei RT @BinyavangaW: @keimiller @anniepaul Got Garnet drunk …conversation unfinished….lol
let us look free at the beautiful thing we have been allowed to make.
Another Branda Fassie: Joy – Paradise road.wmv  via @YouTube
and Kei will be here, not to worry :) RT @BinyavangaW: @anniepaul @keimiller DealDone.
@anniepaul @keimiller nope. ileave the assumption now all u west indians wherelike beating each other over poetry competitions high school.
Off to Jamaica this December.
It’s happening RT @BinyavangaW: Off to Jamaica this December.
@anniepaul nairobi. just back from drunkenness in NYC
ah just back from too much walking in NYC RT @BinyavangaW: @anniepaul nairobi. just back from drunkenness in NYC
@anniepaul Dat @keimiller is a free man – and the work, the work….free-ing.
@SafiaA lol. it will be fine..this is not a paper, it is an opinion…love
@SafiaA Will never storify myself, don’t like that editing.
in bed with sugar free cough drops.

Lynchings are NOT just any other murder…#DwayneJones

Watch incredible CVM video footage of Dwayne Jones, 2 months before his lynching, talking about his fear of being killed at the hands of the police, the difficulties of being homeless and demonstrating his awesome dancing skills for the camera crew. Horrific to think that society could not protect him from his worst fears.

On August 13, after a weekend during which Jamaica got a lot of bad press in the international media over the Dwayne Jones case, BBC Radio’s highly acclaimed programme World Have Your Say, held a half hour discussion on the subject of being gay in Jamaica, triggered by the violent killing of Dwayne Jones on July 22nd. I was invited to be on the show along with local BBC rep Nick Davies, Jalna, convenor of a group called Quality of Citizenship Jamaica, who identified herself as lesbian and Bishop Alvin Bailey from the Portmore Holiness Christian Church. I was invited because the producers had read my blog, Active Voice, and the two posts I did on the Dwayne James murder.

The discussion was quite robust although Bishop Bailey seemed not to realize that this particular gender war is about the freedom of gays/homosexuals to be open about their sexuality in Jamaica. His comments suggested that much ado was being made about nothing and he even asked if he was living in the same Jamaica the rest of us were talking about. His contention was that there are many homosexuals living and working in Jamaica peacefully and that most of the murders of gay people were by fellow gays. When Jalna talked of the fear she felt at having threats directed at her when she had to walk on the street he asked how people knew she was a lesbian (!). This suggests that the good Reverend  is unaware that the debate is about gays in Jamaica being able to ‘come out’ (of the closet) without being threatened with bodily harm, something not one of those hundreds of professionals feels comfortable enough to do. Conform to gender norms of dress and behaviour he seems to be saying, and every little thing’s gonna be alright. Three Little Birds…

Here’s an MP3 of the BBC World Have Your Say discussion on being transgender in Jamaica in case you want to listen to it yourselves. There’s a general introduction dealing with international news and then the discussion begins:

Nationwide’s Emily Crooks having listened to part of the BBC discussion, mentioned it on her radio programme the morning after, saying that the world didn’t realize that the lack of reaction to Dwayne Jones’s murder was not to be read as homophobia but as the sign of a population inured and calloused to murder in general…as if a lynching is equivalent to the random murders that take place daily. According to her the lack of outrage at his death was hardly exceptional for a population accustomed to 2-3 murders a day and he wasn’t the only child who had been murdered recently either, she added, just look at the shooting of 11 year old Tashanique James, in the west Kingston community of Denham Town on August 1.

I found this interesting. In an earlier discussion I’d had with the intrepid Simon Crosskill, a prominent TV journalist here, he made a similar point, claiming that he didn’t understand why Dwayne’s murder was any different or more deserving of attention than that of Tashanique James. Both Crosskill and Crooks claim like many others that there is simply no difference between Dwayne’s murder and all the other horrible murders that happen regularly in Jamaica. This view is also very widespread on social media and for that matter in traditional media.

Human rights campaigners tried to point out that Dwayne Jones’s murder qualified as a ‘hate crime’ but this didn’t help either.  Many Jamaicans on social media were adamant that Jones’s death merited no special concern or attention. In the next paragraph I quote a few tweets that illustrate this sentiment.

A couple of days after the lynching former deputy police commissioner Mark Shields, who came here on loan from Scotland Yard 10 or so years ago, and is now resident in Jamaica, tweeted the following:

Mark Shields @marxshields: 
The lack of condemnation by political & church leaders re#DwayneJones murder is sending a message to Jamaica that it condones hate crimes.

And he received what now seems to me to be the standard party line in Jamaica from my good friend @Grindacologist. To wit:

Grindacologist @Grindacologist: 
RT @marxshields: lack of condemnation by political & church leaders re #DwayneJones murder ¤ 1000+ murders a year…why this one special?

The two following tweets came weeks later, during or immediately after the BBC show, but they express almost exactly the same view:

Dat Mawga Bwoi @MrKritique
What is different about this 17 year old that has been killed tho why this much publicity? 17 year old die everyday in JA @anniepaul

Dennis Marlon @dennisbroox
…The retired Priest was killed too. That was sad too. Jamaicans moved on too. Not that special in the indifference dept

So what’s going on here? Surely even an imbecile can see that there’s a difference between an ordinary murder and a lynching. Neither Emily Crooks nor Simon Crosskill could ever be mistaken for imbeciles. What is the blind spot that makes top Jamaican journalists and others oblivious to this difference? On the grounds of that fact alone the Dwayne Jones killing is immediately in a separate category from shootings like that of Tashanique James who was killed by a stray bullet in a gang war in Denham Town.  Everyone is in agreement that killings such as that of young Tashanique are wrong. Gangs have been targeted by police for years now and there are policies in place (as ineffectual as they may seem) to remedy this situation.

There are no such policies in place to deter mob killings, which have been on the rise in the last few years. It’s barely a year since that horrific attack by a mob on a man and his daughter in Trelawny, in which the father was chopped to death, his daughter left severely injured and their house burnt to the ground. Their sin? They had the misfortune to be related to a young man suspected by the mob of having ‘sodomized’ two young boys who had drowned in a nearby river. The man who was killed was the young man’s stepfather, not even a blood relative. But here’s the clincher: Police reports said that there was no sign whatsoever that the drowned boys had been sodomized (buggered). Yet this mob descended on the house of a young man they insisted had violated the boys and when they didn’t find him there put to death his stepfather and slashed his sister with machetes.

THAT was a good occasion to talk about homophobia but did we? NO. We shoved it under the carpet, pretended that all was normal in good old Jamdown, and moved right along. We certainly never got to hear the kind of details about the victims of that mob killing we’ve seen about Tashanique James, the 11 year old girl mentioned earlier.

Similarly we know far more about Dwayne Jones, the family he came from, the circumstances of his abandonment at their hands, who his friends were, the kind of person he was, from international media who were able to glean all this from as far away as Canada where the Toronto Star devoted the entire front page of last Sunday’s paper to this story. None of the media houses here considered it worth their while to humanize him by letting us know these details about him. Contrast this with the killing of Tashanique James which prompted the Gleaner to devote its senior-most journalist, Arthur Hall, to the story, in which he proceeded to do just that. His front page story, Outspoken child becomes victim of gunman’s bullet,  showed us the human face of the little girl who had been so brutally cut down and then did a follow up story on the gang warfare that had resulted in her death.

No such consideration for Dwayne Jones. Not even though he died in extraordinary circumstances which in themselves merited front page coverage. But oh no, how dare you say this lack of media attention was because we’re homophobic? It’s just that the media can’t keep up with all the murders that take place here everyday.

In a sensational posthumous scoop CVM TV announced on its main newscast two days ago that they had just realized that in covering another story in the St James area two months ago, their reporters had actually met Dwayne Jones and done an in-depth interview with him. Not only that, he dances for their camera, extraordinarily lithe, bouncing with life–so hard to imagine such vitality snuffed out for nothing at all. It’s a measure of the dysfunctionality of our main media houses, and the class and gender biases they suffer from, that it took them three weeks to realize they had this stunning footage. You can watch it in the video below. The TV host is none other than my good friend Simon Crosskill, mentioned earlier in this post. This is how Jamaican media should have covered this terrible killing from the beginning.

In case anyone thinks I harp too much on the shortcomings of the media let me point out one of the dangers of local press not recording a murder in all its gory detail especially when you know that it’s likely to attract international attention. Look at this conversation I came across on Facebook, posted on the wall of a group calling itself I AM JAMAICA, the day the Associated Press story hit the news all over the world about a week ago. A woman named Greta asks if anyone’s seen the story which appeared on and posts it. Another person named Dean reassures her that the foreign media has made all this up pointing to the lack of eyewitness accounts, photographs and generally coverage of the murder by local media to make his argument(!):

Greta Mellerson: I AM JAMAICA
Did you hear about this, got this from yahoo

In Jamaica, transgender teen murdered by mob
MONTEGO BAY, Jamaica (AP) — Dwayne Jones was relentlessly teased in high school for being effeminate until he dropped out. His father not only kicked him out of the house at the age of 14 but also helped jeering neighbors push the youngster from the rough Jamaican slum where he grew up.

Greta Mellerson: Even though I am anti-gay, I don’t think we should go as far as to kill people for what they want to become or do in life. As long as it does not hurt anyone in the interim.

Dean Strachan: its false reporting generated by the gay lobby similar to how the republicans and Faux news creates stories that doesnt relate to the real events.
the gay teen was shot to death and dumped by his friends.
then they made up this story about him being attacked by a straight mob in a dancehall on** a monday night at 3 am.
Yet there is no eye witness report nor pictures.
with all the cellphone cameras in jamaica and cheap phone credits.
not even the owners of the dancehall.
moreover permits have to br issued to have dance.
and no permit would be issued by the police for a monday night dance.
it also have the teen beaten and chopped.
Only he was killed by the bullets or five gun shots.
its just another murdoch type entertainment for news.

Greta Mellerson: You see de now Dean Strachan, people reading this would believe it and don’t have somebody like you fe straighten out de story! Now this is coming from yahoo (USA), that means lots of people maybe cancelling their trips to the island because of this, that means less $. So it could be a political move! thanks for straightening out dis story ya!

Dean Strachan: the story has been all over the place, but the government dont think it is important enogh to deal with it before it start affect the revinues. then they wiill spend millions to mop up it.

Incredibly the group’s catchline says “I AM JAMAICA is responsible for attracting and developing foreign investments. We will guide you throughout your decision making process.” Not sure why they think investors would be attracted to a country where occasional lynchings take place, homosexuals are told they’re not wanted, there are so many murders the media can’t keep up and the justice and police system are shambolic.

Are we ever going to give up the fondly held myth that Jamaica is an English-speaking, heterosexual, devoutly Christian nation of polite people who run fast and make great music? Your guess is as good as mine.

The Senseless Death of Dwayne Jones aka Gully Queen



gullyqueen3 gullyqueen4

I’ve been very disturbed by the wanton slaying of the young wo/man in these photographs, Dwayne Jones. S/he was killed on Monday night in St. James, not far from Montego Bay, the tourism capital of Jamaica. As the excerpt quoted below says, Dwayne was killed after a woman recognized him and irresponsibly outed him at a party he attended cross-dressed in female clothes.

I think this woman should be identified and made an example of, don’t you? She must be sanctioned for needlessly endangering the life of a Jamaican citizen. And the media should treat this as the front page story it really is. Had Dwayne Jones come from Cherry Gardens or Norbrook, there wouldn’t have been another news item in Jamaica since Monday. But poor Dwayne was just a Gully person, worse he was an effeminate trans gendered Gully person…no space for him, no place, no grace, only jungle justice.

As a friend observed on Facebook:

Ignorant Hateful Jamaicans carry out their god’s commands.

The following excerpt is from the Minority-Insights blog:

On July 22, 2013 Dwayne Jones a Trans-gender otherwise known as “GULLY QUEEN” and “Dwayne Gagastar Trensetta” was shot and stabbed to death in the Irwin community, St James.
According to Iriefm news report, “the 17-year-old was dressed as a female and was dancing with a male, when a woman at the party recognized him and told other patrons that he was not a woman, but a male. One of the men at the party accosted the teen and conducted a search where he discovered that the teen was not a female. A mob then descended on the teen and chopped and stabbed him to death, before dumping his body in bushes along the Orange main road.”

Furthermore, the Jamaica-Gleaner reported that, “a number of explosions were heard and the police were summoned. They discovered Jones’ body on the roadway, with multiple stab wounds and a gunshot wound.” No arrest has been made.

For more click here.

Jamaica is my HOME: Javed Jaghai and the We are Jamaicans campaign

Jamaica’s LGBT community has come up with the most imaginative and moving campaign called We Are Jamaicans to deal with the widespread local hostility towards homosexuals. It is a series of videos in which  young Jamaican gays come out on camera, in an effort to directly put their case to the nation as it were; some like Javed in the video above reveal their faces, others simply use index cards. These YouTube videos have been circulating widely on social media but as many have pointed out in all the fuss traditional media made about the New Kingston street gays and the problem they were causing in the most expensive part of the city, the Golden Triangle–none of them even took note of this unprecedented campaign by the local gay community and JFLAG.

Javed Jaghai’s video above is a must see. It is a brilliant and provocative plea. And a very brave one for in it he squarely faces the camera and identifies himself–and his posture is not that of a supplicant, an outcast begging to be let in–there is a more than a hint in it of that very Jamaican quality–defiance. Watch it and see what you think…

“…the creation of our collective homophobia?”

Today the Gleaner carried a headline and article which has dominated the talk shows all morning. “Gays Wreak Havoc – Cops Say Homosexuals Too Much To Handle In South East St Andrew“. The first paragraph says it all:

Police personnel assigned to the St Andrew Central Division are admitting they are at their wits’ end in their bid to apprehend members of an ever-increasing group of self-proclaimed homosexuals who are allegedly wreaking havoc in the Golden Triangle and New Kingston communities of South East St Andrew.

Jamaicans have only themselves to blame for this problem of homeless gay street youth. This isn’t the first time we’re hearing about this. Several times last year we heard about the problems police were having with aggressive homeless homosexuals in New Kingston (see above video). JFLAG (the local gay rights lobby group) attempted to mediate but finally threw up their arms in frustration as it seemed there was little they could do to help. The young gay street youth wouldn’t listen to them. People calling up the radio stations are demanding swift punitive action but the Police have nowhere to put the young men if they arrest them and therefore  are ‘at their wits’ end’ as the article startlingly says.

Well this is clearly a case of the chickens coming home to roost. In December I read a blogpost that asked a very pertinent, self-evident  question: “Could this monster, which has come back to haunt us, be the creation of our collective homophobia?”

The writer goes on to point out that if Jamaican attitudes to homosexuality force families to evict members who are gay and if society in general then denies the young men decent jobs and the social wherewithal to make lives for themselves the outcasts will then do what outcasts everywhere do for survival: beg, borrow, steal, harrass, attack and generally ‘get on bad’.

It’s a predictable outcome. Why are we so surprised? Here is a homegrown case for a drastic revision of the counter-productive but widespread local bias against gays. This pressure isn’t coming from the international gay community, there is no foreign hand we can point to accusingly, this is a case of putting our house in order by ensuring that we don’t stigmatize those who are different from us, casting them out of society till they have no choice but to prey on the rest of us. There is not much the police can do about this problem. The solution to this one lies fairly and squarely in the hands of all Jamaicans. Let’s deal with it post-haste by dismantling the atmosphere of hysteria and denial surrounding homosexuality.

“…a mob of educated fools”: How will Jamaica staunch its homophobia?

The Merchant of Feathers II

Is the mother whose son is found

in a compromising position with a man

in a university bathroom

and is beaten by security guards

who police anuses

while girls walk unguarded in the night

and a mob of educated fools chant

for more blood, more fire.

This mother must put her son back together again

paint his wounds with Gentian Violet

ice swollen tendons, protuberant eyes

find the scars deeper than skin

and like a seamstress mend what’s broken within

and when his father who isn’t worth two dry stones

or a shilling sees his son on the news and appears

at her door to beat her son some more

she will turn herself into serrated edges

stand sharp and poised to kill

for her son is her only gold

and if the father’s thirst for blood is too great

she will pacify him with what he needs

to prove he is not like his son.

In her, he will bury the fear.

And in the morning she will stir soft words into

the cornmeal porridge, carry it to her son’s bed

blow a benediction into each spoon full she brings

to his bruised and beautiful lips.

Tanya Shirley

Shirley’s poem quoted in full above with her permission is a timely intervention into the barbarism threatening to drown us. She speaks eloquently for those of us who yearn for a healing of the nation not unlike the one administered by the mother in this poem.

The fish in this cartoon references current Jamaican slang for male homosexuals; in addition to ‘batty bwoy’ ‘fish’ is a popular synonym for gay men here. So the security guards at UTECH were exhorted to ‘Beat di fish!’ by the mob. Obviously the common expression ‘like a fish out of water’ would also apply to this cartoon by Clovis, November 05, 2012, Jamaica Observer.

And a postscript to my previous post on whether gay bashing is a national policy. No, it isn’t. Here is what the education minister said as a coda to the whole ‘sex text’ imbroglio (as reported in the Gleaner):

“The principles that must be at all times respected is that the Ministry of Education promotes sexually responsible behaviour in the context of faithful union between a man and woman while offering respect and compassion to those who adopt a different lifestyle.”

It’s how to get more Jamaicans to adopt this reasonable outlook that is the problem. The visual below captures the absurdity of the Jamaican lynch mob well.

copyright Norman F Cooper

Gay Bashing in Jamaica a national policy?

Clovis, The Jamaica Observer

Personally i think the right punishment for the University of Technology (UTECH) students so eager to lynch an allegedly gay student should be a year’s community service at JFLAG…that’s the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, Allsexuals and Gays. I also think that all of Jamaica’s major institutions, its leaders and its citizens are responsible for the beating the unfortunate UTECH student received. I’ll explain in a minute but first for anyone who doesn’t have the requisite background on this latest episode of homophobic violence in Jamaica please read Petchary’s Blog and the post titled Sticks and Stones for details.

Here’s why i say almost everyone is to blame for the violence that exploded on the UTECH campus this Thursday. The Education Minister Ronald Thwaites was on air yesterday righteously denouncing the episode and calling for the mob of students to be expelled. Yet only a few days before that he was in the media talking about a ‘gay agenda’ which had apparently had a sinister hand in the reform of the health and family life education curriculum for high schools in Jamaica.

Las May, The Gleaner, March 4, 2011

To quote the Gleaner article which reported on this at the time:

The Sexuality and Sexual Health: Personal Risk and Assessment Checklist segment of the third edition of the curriculum geared at grades seven to nine was what caused the uproar.

Contentious Questions

Among the questions posed to students were: Have you ever had sexual intercourse? Have you ever had anal sex without a condom? What caused you to be a heterosexual? When and how did you first discover you were heterosexual? If you have never slept with a member of your own sex, is it possible you might be gay if you tried it? Why do heterosexuals seduce others into their lifestyle?

The book also instructed students to perform a number of exercises to better understand their sexuality.

Yesterday, Minister of Education Ronald Thwaites ordered the curriculum pulled, saying some of the material was “inappropriate”.

“I have been made aware of widespread public concern about certain sections of the health and family life education programme curriculum used in Jamaican schools. There is strong objection to some of the questions on sexual behaviour and the commentary on heterosexuality/homosexuality,” the minister said.

“I consider sections of the material inappropriate for any age and certainly for the grade seven and eight students for which it is designed.”

He added, “I have instructed that the material be withdrawn from all schools and rewritten then redistributed so as to prevent disruption of the health and family life education instruction.”

Meanwhile the Jamaica Observer devoted an editorial, Not Enough Mr. Thwaites, to denouncing the sinister plot to sensitize Jamaican children to alternative sexualities. Here is part of what it said:

WHILE the practice of homosexuality is accepted and considered a basic human right in many other countries, Jamaican law and cultural norms disapprove.

The situation as it relates to Jamaica will perhaps change in time to come; but not yet, and not, we believe, for some time yet.

We should recall that this newspaper is on record — as is the current Prime Minister Mrs Portia Simpson Miller — as saying that the country needs to revisit the archaic, centuries-old buggery law.

However, in the meantime, Jamaican law and culturally accepted behaviour should be respected.

In that respect, we are unsurprised by the suggestion from Minister of Education Rev Ronald Thwaites that at least two persons involved in the drafting of the Health and Family Life Education Programme (HFLEP) curriculum, recently pulled from local high schools because of what can perhaps best be described as ‘gay friendly’ sexual content, “had a particular agenda and were able to embed it in the curriculum”.

For, in our view, loaded questions for teenagers, which were reportedly included in the rejected curriculum, such as “have you ever had anal sex?” and “if you have never slept with a member of your own sex, is it possible that you might be gay if you tried it?” suggest an agenda of sorts. We say this particularly in light of the Jamaican context.

Also, this was clearly not a stand-alone case. The minister tells us that “it does appear that there were previous instances, and there were warnings, and it was a clear intention of some who have very clear predispositions regarding sexual conduct… who got away on this one”.

A look back to 2007 will reveal that the then Minister of Education Mr Andrew Holness felt compelled to tell the country that a book on home economics was not endorsed by his ministry. This followed revelation of a section which claimed that “when two women or two men live together in a relationship as lesbians or gays, they may be considered a family”.

The problems with the withdrawal of the revised curriculum are succinctly stated by Maurice Tomlinson, a former UTECH lecturer, who had to flee Jamaica when he recently married his partner in Canada. In a post titled Countdown to Tolerance Tomlinson points the finger at the brands of Christianity practised in the country for this interference in school curricula.

Previously, in August 2011, to be precise, both Jamaica’s national TV stations refused to air a public service announcement designed to address the problem of intolerance towards gays in this country. To view the PSA in question and for further details read the post i wrote at the time, No Unconditional Love? Jamaica and its homosexuals, part of which i excerpt below (I’m indebted to both Winsome Chambers and Sonjah Stanley Niaah for reminding me of the PSA episode):

The situation in Jamaica concerning the status and well-being of its homosexual citizens continues to evolve in a one step forward-two steps backward manner. The video above,  featuring former Miss Jamaica World (1998) and Miss Jamaica Universe (2004) Christine Straw with her gay brother, Matthew, was launched by the advocacy group Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals, and Gays (J-FLAG) at the beginning of this month.

The video was designed as a PSA (Public Service Announcement) and was intended for airplay on Jamaica’s main TV stations, CVM and TVJ. Apparently in yet another display of media gutlessness both stations have declined to air the PSA in fear of public reaction.

So the point I’m making is: how is the change so desperately needed to prevent further episodes of violence towards homosexuals in Jamaica going to occur if those responsible for change through education–the Ministry, the media and the Church (in all its multi-denominational glory)–refuse to undertake the dissemination of material designed to change hearts and minds? What are our tertiary institutions going to do about this? In a separate post i will detail the history of similar incidents at the University of the West Indies and Northern Caribbean University to show that although UTECH is now in the spotlight such an episode could well have occurred (and have occurred in the past) at any of Jamaica’s tertiary institutions.


Finally Owen Black Ellis has just detailed on Facebook an instance that actually happened in Jamaica which highlights the lethal absurdity of local hostility towards gays:


The whole Utech saga has me remembering something that happened couple years ago to a couple I know and their friends. This is a true story. It was valentines day and two couples were having a meal in an uptown fast food joint. The girls were sitting down at the table and the guys were in the bathroom writing up the valentines day cards they bought earlier to give to the two girls who were waiting outside. They were laughing and reading and comparing each other’s cards when a man walked in and assumed they were giving the cards to each other, so he raised an alarm “yow people, two battybwoy inna di bathroom a exchange Valentines day card’. People, in no time a crowd converged, and no amount of explaining from the guys and begging for mercy by the girls could save them. And as they crowd grew and people asked about what happened, some added ‘dem mussi did in deh a have sex’ etc.. etc…so the details got more sensational and the condemnation got more intense, and the beating was wicked…




No Unconditional Love? Jamaica and its homosexuals


The situation in Jamaica concerning the status and well-being of its homosexual citizens continues to evolve in a one step forward-two steps backward manner. The video above,  featuring former Miss Jamaica World (1998) and Miss Jamaica Universe (2004) Christine Straw with her gay brother, Matthew, was launched by the advocacy group Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals, and Gays (J-FLAG) at the beginning of this month.

The video was designed as a PSA (Public Service Announcement) and was intended for airplay on Jamaica’s main TV stations, CVM and TVJ. Apparently in yet another display of media gutlessness both stations have declined to air the PSA in fear of public reaction.

Prominent Gleaner columnist and TV show host Ian Boyne devoted his entire Sunday column to the subject:

It is to our shame that Jamaican gay people cannot come on television, show their faces, debate their homosexuality with heterosexuals, go back home in peace and to their jobs and live normal lives the next day. If we lay claim to being a pluralistic, democratic society and not an autocracy like Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Burma, Pakistan, Nepal, Afghanistan, gay people should be free to express their views without fear of violence, harassment or victimisation.

But what about the view that homosexuality is against Jamaican law and, therefore, it would be improper to show such blatant disrespect for Jamaican law by parading gay people on air, or showing an ad effectively calling for a softening of attitudes to these persons engaging in lawbreaking?

Of course Jamaica being the morally upright, unswervingly ethical society it is could never contemplate showing homosexuals who may have breached the country’s antiquated buggery laws on air. No it takes a zero tolerance approach to homosexuals.  In a disturbing inversion of logic serious and serial criminals like David Smith and Christopher Coke have yet to be brought to book  in Jamaica for crimes far more damaging than buggery while the US  subjects them to the full brunt of its justice system. Smith, who has just been sentenced to 30 years in the US was a regular on air in Jamaica, in print and on radio and both political parties willingly accepted donations from him. But can a homosexual openly occupy public office or appear on TV? No way!

To their credit the People’s National Party seems to have started some kind of soul-searching on the matter although the motive in doing this might be a purely opportunistic one. Anthony Hylton, chair of the Opposition People’s National Party (PNP) Policy Commission, was quoted in an Observer article observing that it was time for the country to initiate a dialogue on such matters as the death penalty and homosexuality.

The people in Europe are saying what kind of people are we, why are we so hostile to homosexuals, for example, and yet we know why, because we have a different cultural perspective, but we have to manage that dialogue with them, otherwise they’re going to say why are our taxpayers’ money going to these brutish people?”

According to Hylton, if we don’t deal with the issues, “we are going to be marginalised economically”.

As I said the unprecedented soul-searching seems to be prompted more by fears of not being able to access funding from the ‘developed’ world rather than a genuine desire towards greater tolerance of difference and ‘diversity’.

Meanwhile in the absence of a shelter or any facilities they can access homeless  homosexual males are driven into the  streets of Kingston where they resort to prostitution to make a living.  According to Chairman of JAMAICA Aids Support for Life (JASL), Ian McKnight, “…while the issue might not sit well with a number of taxpayers, the situation transcends personal or religious beliefs and, instead, is a matter that should be tackled by the administration.”

McKnight was quoted in the Observer saying that though  “it would be very costly to house all the homeless living in abandoned buildings and gullies in the New Kingston area…shelter should be provided for those forced out of their homes and communities and onto the streets as a result of their sexual preference.

“Many of them, he said, are vulnerable to being beaten by the police, attacked by men riding motorbikes and stoned by those bent on ridding them from society.”

So despite Jah Cure’s hauntingly beautful song–one of the most outstanding reggae songs in decades some say–there is no unconditional love for all Jamaicans. Cure, a reformed inmate who did time on a rape charge, is another lawbreaker that Jamaicans have more time for than their own children with alternate sexual orientations.

“Out and bad”? The politics of homosexuality in Jamaica

Clovis, Jamaica Observer, July 13, 2011

The news media in Jamaica continues to score high on the #fail scale. Yesterday several media entities reported that Senior Superintendent Fitz Bailey had announced that young gay men were behind most organised crime in Jamaica. If you watch the video below you will hear Bailey explaining that what he said was that 80-90% of the culprits arrested for the infamous lottery scam which has generated an alarming number of murders in recent years were homosexuals.

Bailey never said anything about organized crime. He was very specific, he was talking about the Lottery Scam and the high number of homosexuals implicated in it.

“I have empirical data to support that. We have the responsibility to investigate these cases (and) we’re not targeting any specific group or saying people should go and attack anyone. All I’m talking about is the profile of the individuals (involved in the lottery scam) just like we talk about the profile of persons who are involved in child sexual exploitation,” SSP Bailey stated Tuesday evening, July 12, on RJR’s daily current affairs discussion programme Beyond The Headlines.

What empirical data is he talking about? According to an interview Bailey gave on Newstalk 93FM this morning the criminals self-identify as homosexual when they are charged so that they can be protected from hostile, gay-hating inmates in prison. Bailey said there was even one ‘area leader’ or don who declared his sexuality openly when arrested. For some reason this puts me in mind of something Marlon James told me in an interview I did with him on The Silo six or so months ago–that he was fascinated by the idea of balletic young [Jamaican] men dancing, machine gun in hand as it were. Here’s a few outtakes from that interview:

–you need the person firing the short sharp shots–the jackhammer–but you also need the person who can survey coz jackhammers can’t heal–

–you need the nuanced take as well…the nuanced take is just as important as the polemic…

–my new novel is about killers, in fact its about the killers of killers…something i’ve always been fascinated by–the people who do the actual killing, not the ones who decide on a hit–

–its funny–you go to Passa Passa (the most hardcore event on the dancehall calendar), there was one guy–you know jamaican dancehall moves are very sort of graceful,  almost effeminate, i know i’m going to get killed for this but its very  ornate and very delicate…and somebody pointed him out to me and said y’know that’s one of the biggest gunmen out here–this whole idea of the super graceful killer, i find it fascinating, you know? almost like a ballet dancer who kills on the weekend…

So its not true that Bailey’s statement, abhorrent as it may seem, was based on observing such superficial tendencies as clothing, mannerisms and speech patterns on the part of the criminals the police had apprehended in the Lottery Scam or the credit/debit card scams–it was based on the high number of those arrested who told the police that they were gay! And as Bailey further explained this was not surprising because if gay prisoners are not kept separate from the straight prisoners it could result in tragedy as it did in 1997 when 16 homosexual prisoners were brutally killed in anti-gay prison riots.

This morning I recieved an email from an old friend. I quote it verbatim for what its worth:

Remember that 60s slogan “I’m Black and I’m Proud?”
Its back with a Policeman’s statement that gays are open about their orientation and not hiding it. He said they are major players in lottery scam and Credit Crad/Debit card scam. Also said last kidnapped victim was tortured:

I do believe that the gays are “Gay and Proud” and not afraid to flaunt it.

They are not hiding anymore, at least not the younger, effeminate ones.

We had a couple in our community who would flaunt it in your face, sat on verandah in female panties and bra, ran down one another with machete, had female names for each other, had male only parties, cross dressed, made passes at the census taker and the male teens, prostitution.

Anyway they were sent on their way.
Sure others are still here, male and female but those behave without violence toward one another nor threats to the neighbours.
They moved nearby and started the whole thing all over again so the neighbours marched on their residence.

The situation has changed so Gomes/Jamaicans for Justice must keep up.

I think that before we can proceed all sides need to be heard. The gay rights position has been articulated loudly, clearly and frequently, bolstered by the muscle of international gay rights organizations. It’s time to listen to what some Jamaicans are saying about why they are often driven to hostile thoughts and actions. The fact is that the behaviour described in the email above would attract the same reaction were it heterosexuals who were causing such problems instead of homosexuals.

I end by quoting the kind of nuanced take Marlon James probably had in mind when he mentioned it in that interview. It’s by my dear friend Kei Miller, whose sharp new blog Under the Saltire Flag  has considerably enriched the blogosphere in recent times:

Elephant Man’s 2001 hit ‘Log On’ has always seemed to me to contain contradictory instructions. On the one hand he encourages us to ‘log on’ – to actively participate in the new virtual world of the internet, and perhaps more broadly, to sign up to the future (quite literally, for the act of logging on often requires a name and a password). On the other hand he asks that we ‘step pon chi-chi man’ – that we continue in a posture of virulent homophobia, a regressive attitude which most will agree is incompatible with this other idea of progress.

Unsurprisingly, the song drew the ire of international human rights activists. Yes yes – that again! If you’ve begun to roll your eyes, I can forgive you, because it truly is a tiresome issue. About this, I have always been conflicted. On the one hand I support the idea that basic human rights should be extended to each and every citizen, and wherever this is culturally ambiguous, the law should be made to underline these rights clearly.

On the other hand I feel that a lot of the international human rights campaigns have been compromised by a deep contempt for the societies on whose behalf they campaign.

Look – people are not idiots. There is what a man says, and then again, there is what he actually means. Most people are fully capable of hearing beyond the noise of the first, to the subtlety of the second. So when an activist, in London for instance, says, ‘Oh this is outrageous! Jamaica really ought to protect the rights of its most vulnerable citizens, especially members of the glbt community!’ … what Jamaicans actually hear (and they are usually right) is:  ‘Oh Jamaica, how I pity you! You primitive, savage and barbaric people! Also, I would like you to know that I am better than you!’

You know, it really is contemptuous that a country that took a few hundred years to ‘progress’ in its own attitudes should feel that the rest of the world (very often her former colonies saddled with her discarded laws and her old ideas of morality) should be ‘up to de time’ as soon as she is. And it is a very hard thing for the people of a former colony to accept lessons in human rights from people who for centuries had denied them theirs.

Jamaican attitudes towards homosexuality are shifting. Those who militate on behalf of gay rights here and elsewhere need to respond to this, rather than to non-existent straw men.

Buju Redux: What Boom Bye Bye Means

This cartoon is a play on Banton’s 2006 hit single ‘Driver A’, which ironically makes references to a hypothetical secret ganja (marijuana) smuggling operation in the U.S. Taken from Dancehall Mobi‘s website.

I just came across this rather nuanced and critical post on Buju on Afrobella’s blog and found myself responding at length. Thought i may as well cut and paste my response here. Afrobella was making several points (among them the absurdity of denying that Buju seems to have had more than a close encounter with a certain white powder) but I was responding to her point that contrary to what is claimed Buju does often still perform Boom Bye Bye. Here’s what she said:

“I know there are those that deny that Buju still performs the song, but I’ve seen him tease it, freestyle it, and rile up an audience with it more than once — most memorably in 2006, at Best of the Best in Miami. I turned and left that Buju concert because of that switch in his personality, from incredible entertainer to hatemonger at the drop of a beat…”

I found myself leaving the following response. My thoughts on all this are really developing in response to the opinions i come across on the subject in blogs and other online fora. i’ve added and edited my original response a bit here:
I too find the argument that Boom Bye Bye is such an old song, Buju doesn’t do it anymore etc, specious because at almost every concert he is required by the audience to at least gesture towards it in the way that you’ve mentioned, if not actually perform it. I’ve always believed that Jamaica’s anti-homosexual rhetoric especially as expressed in the music is much more than merely an exhortation of violence against homosexuals.

This one song Boom Bye Bye probably captures many of the varying targets for public disapproval in Ja in its seemingly straightforward lyrics originally written to protest the rape and kiling of a male child by, presumably, homosexuals. From targeting one particular homosexual rapist and murderer, the song went on to become an anthem targeting all such predators. The problem is that in Jamaica (as in many other places) male homosexuals are invariably seen as predatory and the proscription against predatory homosexuals then becomes one against all homosexuals.

Unfortunately matters have now got to the point where in addition to this conflation the figure of the homosexual has also become conflated with the evils of globalization in Jamaica. It is in effect as if the culture believes it is being raped by the outside world (as my Facebook friend Paul Anthony Vaughn would say: Violation!), and one of the manifestations of this is the demand by developed nations that homosexuality should be legalized or de-criminalized; another is the addition of programming on American/UK cable tv with central characters who are unabashedly homosexual; and of course there is the recent direct, concentrated pressure from international gay rights organizations on Jamaican musicians. I believe that when Buju’s audiences demand that he sing Boom Bye Bye and he playfully gives them the intro, wheels etc and appears to perform it or actually performs it it is an affirmation of Jamaica’s resistance to the onslaughts of globalization and not so much any longer a mere call to rid the nation of homosexuals. The audience’s response is one of jubilation at their mutual refusal to back down in the face of ‘unreasonable’ and arbitrary demands to change the culture from the outside.

anyway, that’s my take on all this. For me it’s actions, not so much lyrics, that count and Buju lost his stature in my eyes when he was accused of actually breaking into the house of and beating up some homosexuals so severely that they needed to be hospitalized. that’s when i stopped listening to his music as i used to before.

So in summing up, just as you and Sarah Manley have pointed out the good and bad sides of Buju, presenting a more nuanced portrait of this conflicted figure it’s necessary also to nuance what homosexuality represents in cultures such as Jamaica, that homosexuality too has its good and bad sides, to differentiate between predatory homosexuality and just being a homosexual…because its the latter that we want to defend not the former. And people do have a right to protest the former.

So in effect Boom Bye Bye has what in academic parlance is called ‘multivalence’. It is a multivalent allegory or text, meaning simply that it has multiple meanings. I now await the wrath of Long Bench and various anonymous friends. Please be gentle.