PRESSURE

Linking to the second issue of PREE, an online portal of contemporary Caribbean writing started by a few colleagues and me. check it out! If I’ve stopped writing my Gleaner column, this is the reason. Not a multi-tasker so if i take on something new, something has to be dropped. 

The second issue of PREE focuses on the theme ‘Pressure’.  Pressure buss pipe, yes. But, pressure also creates diamonds. What does pressure do for us tethered to the Caribbean? Is there a pressure to be ‘Caribbean’, to perform Caribbeanness, to act St. Lucian, Grenadian, Trini or Jamaican for instance; a demand that we rigidly embody our culture(s)?

There is the financial pressure to turn coins into dollars and deflated dollars into meals and school fees. There is the cultural pressure to persist and the global pressure to give in. Economic pressure to expand tourism and environmental pressure to protect. The desire for freedom and pressure to remain ‘authentic’. There is social pressure, atmospheric pressure, population pressure, the pressure to achieve the impossible. Also, and sometimes fatally, for too many of us in the region and the diaspora, pressure builds in our blood. Pressure takes root in our hearts and manifests clinically as hypertension and the dangerous possibilities of stroke, heart attack, pulmonary embolism. Pressure underlies any number of presentations of mental illness. Pressure is not just a soul-killing thing, but a thing from which we can actually die. Whichever way you cut it, pressure exists as a powerful invisible force. These are just some of the possible launching points that we asked contributors to wrestle with in this sophomore issue. Via prose, poetry, essays, memoirs, videos, and artwork that explored the possibilities that exist for pressure, PREE contributors did not disappoint.

Editorial

Letter from the EditorAnnie Paul

Fiction

Uncle Carlos’s SocksPatrina Pink

All That You Can Afford to LoseJustin Haynes

The Patience of StoneRichie Maitland

Cursing Mrs. MurphyRoland Watson-Grant

Caribbean Hurricane RhymeJulia Morris Thomson

Voice: Still Want SexOpal Palmer Adisa

Barrel Boy/Cyborg BirthKwasi Shade

“We Want Justice!”Agostinho Pinnock

Non-fiction

Turn up the VolumeLeniqueca Welcome

On Non-Renewable EnergyKatherine Agard

New Rules-Gerard Johnson

Poetry

Resurrection/Easter SundayJovanté Anderson

Three Poems from The Best Estimation in the WorldSonia Farmer

Transmutations/Hide me AwayTraci-Ann Wint-Hayles

Barbados Mulatto Girl/Mangrove VillageAdam Patterson

Da Fruit of Our SperitIde Thompson

One Day She Will Ask about Her NameAnna Corniffe

The Sun/TortolaJannine Horsford

a curse to Adam/DelilahLetitia Pratt

Pressure Drops/Bring Back Love-Ubaldimir Guerra

The Sky Has Not ChangedNigel Assam

Essay

The Gait of the ElephantSunny Singh

Memoir

CoppertoneSarah Manley

Politics TimeKaren Bumi Marks

ART-icles

10th Berlin Biennale: We Don’t Need Another Hero (REVIEW)–David Frohnapfel

Andil Gosine: Coolie, Coolie Viens–Ramabai Espinet

Bernard Hoyes: An InterviewAnnie Paul

Revisit

The Novel Of Tomorrow,  TodayChristopher Laird

PREE Shorties

Emancipatory PropositionBeatriz Llenin-Figueroa

Pressure CookingTiffany Walton

Audio Visual

Four Days in West KingstonDeborah Thomas, Junior “Gabu” Wedderburn


Image credit: Leasho Johnson. No. 5 afflicted from the “playing the field” series. Mixed media on paper. By kind permission of the artist.

Author: ap

writer, editor and avid tweeter

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